Hey Mom!

Hey Mom! That’s a phrase we have all grown up saying – All our questions have been directed to Mom to help answer them all.

‘There is nothing in the world that mom doesn’t know’. Similar to the Thank You Mom Campaign that was done by P&G that connected everyone to the master brand – Google repositioned itself this year in a campaign that touched all our hearts.

There is no love like Momma’s love. Let’s make that a tap away.  ‘Google Home – Give your original helper, a little help of her own’.

In a world where most of us live away from our families, we need to take out time to stay connected with them – sometimes just telling them, thank you mom for everything you have done! <3

So to my mom – #Heymom, thank you!

 

Let her “slip” from your hands

Here is a cultural saying in India: “Ladki Haath se nikal jayegi” – Which means that if you don’t control her, she will slip out of your hands.

And needless to imagine, this leads to a painful slippery slope – girls are not encourged to study, not encouraged to pursue a career, instead – She is simply taught that one day she will get married and take her of her in-laws.

This cultural acceptable since decades has been a systematic reason why women are not in the running for most things including representation of women in schools, work and in leadership positions.

Mahindra Rise,  a foundation for the Mahindra conglomerate kickstarted a movement that really makes you rethink the meaning of “a girl slipping out of your hand”.

From a negative connotation, they simply twisted it to something different – Wouldn’t it be wonderful if you let you girl slip from your hands and help her realise her dreams?

Having my roots in India, and my wings outside:  this story is personally quite hard hitting.

Nest Away in tunes

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An upcoming property rental portal in India came up with a rather quirky way of positioning their value proposition: Paying for a home vs allowing your children to pursue their hobbies.

 

I thought it was a great spin to an otherwise, very boring message. We are moving to a rented economy which frees resources that can be used for so many other things like paying for your own and your family’s hobbies. We are an experience economy and the music teacher’s take on it was just funny and truly drives the point home.

 

 

 

 

UX Design be like (Guest Post)

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When the iPhone came along and made touchscreen-led mobile browsing truly mainstream, it was a fatal blow to the horribly-complex desktop websites of yesteryear. You might be able to get away with a dense and almost-unintelligible layout on a big screen, but it simply won’t fly on a pocketable device.

And it’s really Apple’s approach to design that has shaped the internet of today.

We all know now that usability is among the biggest factors when you’re trying to keep a user around, particularly on the smallest screens, and minimalism has become the name of the game in the user experience (UX) community.

But what does a good minimalist UX look like, exactly? What do top brands like Google, Apple and Microsoft get right more often than not? Let’s break it down.

An Ocean of Negative Space…

Negative space (also sometimes known as white space) is a catch-all term for the empty space between page elements, and if you go by sheer coverage, it’s the biggest part of every UX journey. It’s the canvas on which the internet is painted.

Back before everyone understood the importance of negative space, websites were built by technical experts with no appreciation of good design. They were packed with functions, stats, information and stylistic flourishes, and nothing had any room to breathe. As such, if you didn’t know exactly what to expect from a website, you weren’t going to have much luck using it.

Thankfully, standards caught up with user requirements, and now any website that doesn’t space out its content is just asking for a high bounce rate and low search rankings. Check the lead image: Google knows you’re there to do a search, so it gives you a search bar and a couple of buttons. That’s it. No filler. No distractions. (They’ve learned a lot from Apple over the years…)

…Dotted With Jewels…

You’re ready to design your website, and you have so many design elements to choose from. There are banners, buttons, paragraphs, tables, drop-down menus, links, slideshows, videos, animations and more. But minimalism demands harsh criteria: if something doesn’t add serious value to a page, it doesn’t get included.

Are you on a product page? Something style-centric like a watch or an item of clothing? Then sure, include a glossy high-resolution product image that dominates the page. It warrants the space. Otherwise, get it out of the way. It’s just taking up space, slowing the page speed down, and detracting from the worthwhile content.

Remember that the X stands for ‘experience’, and you need to deliver an experience that’s good within the context of the purpose of your website. If a user shows up looking for information and they get pretty images, they won’t find them too helpful. Every single section of your site should be something the user wants to be there.

…And Built Around Delivery.

There’s a solid reason behind every intentional website visit. We go to ecommerce sites to order products, forums to discuss topics, news sites to learn about what’s going on, and image sites to look at nice landscapes and dream of beach vacations. With millions of websites available, a site either delivers on its promise or loses your attention.

That’s why the best possible minimalist website does one of two things in every single fragment of its user journey:

1 – Deliver what the user wants.

2 – Deliver a clear route to what the user wants.

 

It’s very simple, but that doesn’t stop plenty of websites getting stuck wheeling out vanity features and thinking they can dictate what the users want to see. They can’t. It doesn’t work. The moment the user can’t see what they’re looking for or how to reach it, they’ll give up and head elsewhere.

Templates Make Minimalism Easy

Minimalist UX design is difficult to perfect, absolutely, but it’s also incredibly easy to implement well because it isn’t often about adding things— it’s mostly about leaving them out. If you have a website that’s lacking a really important feature, then yes, you’ll need to add it, but otherwise you can move towards minimalism by simply stripping away anything that isn’t needed.

If you don’t even have a website yet, then it’ll be even easier for you because of the proliferation of pre-built templates. You can start setting up a web boutique through a store builder and go live with a free minimalist theme that provides all the functionality you need, or throw together a basic site and pick from numerous great WP theme options that will barely need configuring if you’d rather not put in much design work.

Minimalism isn’t just a must-have design approach for the user— it’s also a massive time-saver for the designer, and a technical win for SEO and web hosting. There’s no good reason not to migrate your UX efforts to a more minimalist standard, so make sure every feature you include fully deserves its place and you’ll quickly achieve greater levels of user engagement.

A huge thank you to Patrick Faster who wrote this Mooketing exclusive Guest Post.

Patrick Foster is a writer and ecommerce expert from Ecommerce Tips — an industry-leading ecommerce blog that offers practical marketing advice so your online store receives the exposure it deserves. Check out the latest posts on Twitter @myecommercetips

Measure your content Marketing

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You’ve got a whole bunch of awesome content. People are commenting and liking your posts in hordes. You’ve figured that using cute cats in anything you write is well received. You start to wonder what your life would have been if you were a cat instead. Oh, distractions! You snap back into thinking about great content and wonder what’s the real impact of all this effort, all these likes and these cat memes.

Content marketing is an integral part of the marketing mix. As it continues to be able to demonstrate the value on business outcomes, it becomes a heavier and heavier investment.

To create content that people love and enjoy is probably the most important metric. But beyond that, how do you understand the value that it is driving for your business? What is a framework to think about the effectiveness about content marketing? What are the right metrics to use?

Goodbye likes and shares, hello pirate metrics.

I love the pirate metrics because it is so easy to understand, so intuitive and just badass.

Assuming you have setup all the right UTM tracking, let’s deep dive into the framework that I believe works for everyone – AAR (just like the pirates say it).

(A) Acquisition

How do your customers find you? How do they know about you? How do they end up subscribing to your future content? It’s the beginning of your relationship with them and you want to always be aware of what channels are driving this for you. Perhaps it’s word of mouth, conferences, sharing content on Facebook or tweeting quite often. Whatever works for you, it’s surely worth knowing the how.

(A) Activation

How do they first try your product? Or in many cases, what makes them tick? If you write a blog, how do you become a part of their weekly ritual? It’s probably the aha moment when they connect a particular subject matter to you.

(R) Retention

The holy grail of content? Having your users come back to you over and over again. You have brought them into the circle of value – always providing more and giving more.

Retention patterns are starting to understand who consistently comes to you and why but also why some people are not coming back. Retention is a great gauge for the lifetime value that you can provide to your readers and make your one time visit into a long lasting love story.

So, what does this all mean for me?

A) Write for each part of the funnel

You want to be sure that you are writing not just to acquire people, but also to activate – move them to their ‘aha moment’. Think about how different people are simultaneously moving through the funnel and be deliberate to write for each part of it.

B) Measure correctly

If you are not measuring, how will be you be able to understand the value of your work? Be sure to tag (all source, medium to the URLs) and measure all your content and understand the implications across the pirate metrics. Many times you might find that you have too wide an upper funnel and too narrow a lower funnel.

C) Problem solve for drop offs

The AAR framework will give you the ability to understand where people are dropping off in a very simplistic framework. Try to understand why perhaps a specific group of people aren’t coming back to your content pages and start perhaps catering to their needs or questions. A great starting point is to understand who is leaving and then test consistently to understand what makes them tick.

Pirate On: The AAR framework is a very versatile way of measuring the effectiveness of your content marketing. Spend 15 minutes to customise it for your business and you will be amazed by the laser sharpness that it gives to your entire content marketing strategy. Aye, Aye Captain?

 

This post was originally published on joe-escobedo.com. Joe is recognized as one of the “Top 20 Content Marketers” worldwide and awarded the “Most Influential Global Marketing Leader” at the World Marketing Congress. Joe has helped countless organizations and executives transform from unknowns to superheroes online.

We need to chat about WeChat

Slide1I have realised that we have chatted (&blogged) about so many great campaigns, trends and upcoming fab-jazz, but we still haven’t chatted enough about the biggest wave in that is being driven right here – the land where the sun rises (i.e. the East).

Here are the top 5 reason why WeChat is the mega universe of everything that defines ‘magic of your touch screen phone’ –

  1. Make instore payments through QR codes
  2. Send bitcoins to a friend
  3. Manage a personal wealth fund
  4. Pay Utility bills
  5. Check how much a product costs instore by scanning a code

PS: My favourite one that should be at the top of this list – You can book a karaoke through the app. Hello WeChat, Karaoke is my eternal weakness. Oops, did I just reveal my Kkk-Kryptonite to the world?

 

 

The power of product marketing

How many times have you seen a great ad: sometimes cried, once in a while laughed, ads that use some insane technology that makes you go wow but literally – you can’t remember the name of the brand or the value they might drive in your life.

I need to come out of the closet about how strongly I feel about these award hungry “innovative” advertising campaigns that literally drive 0 business value. We all know these ads – you can sniff their award winning desperation from a distance. Hate it.

I’ve always respected brands that are so confident in themselves that all they want to do is drive business value and grow user love. The ‘it name’ for it today is product marketing. Now, I’m not saying that brand marketing is not important or these are 2 are mutually exclusive. I just believe that if you have limited marketing dollars, the most important thing you want to do first is to drive user growth and love – increase product adoption by being explicit about the utility that you drive in someone’s life.

eBay did a great job to re-establish their credibility by proving their value in the market (even if by taking a direct stab at Amazon).

 

I loved the pun on golden number $119. But more so, I loved how direct the messaging was to be like “hey – we provide more value therefore use us over xx”. Really that simple, but so well done.

Marketing is really about simplicity. We tend to over-complicate it.

Simple messaging to the right audience, at the right time to maximise business impact. (Business impact being the operating clause). I think that we need to always remind ourselves that this isn’t about us being creative (you can pickup a paintbrush for that) – this is really about customer value. More value, more love. Simple and beautiful.